Monday, Monday

For those of you too young to remember, Monday, Monday, is a song written and recorded in the 1960s. A popular young group called The Mamas and the Papas made Monday, Monday a big hit. Their soft rock sound and easy singing style spoke to me and many others.

The group and song were favorites of mine and could be heard playing in my college dorm over and over again. At the time, we were likely still too young and naive to fully understand the lyrics.

The lyrics, as well as the music, were written by John Edmund Andrew Phillips:

Monday, Monday, so good to me
Monday morning, it was all I hoped it would be
Oh, Monday morning, Monday morning couldn’t guarantee
That Monday evening, you would still be here with me

Monday, Monday, can’t trust that day
Monday, Monday, sometimes it just turns out that way
Oh, Monday morning, you gave me no warning of what was to be
Oh, Monday, Monday, how could you leave and not take me?

Every other day, every other day
Every other day of the week is fine, yeah
But whenever Monday comes
But whenever Monday comes
You can find me crying all of the time

Monday, Monday, so good to me
Monday morning, it was all I hoped it would be
But Monday morning, Monday morning couldn’t guarantee
That Monday evening, you would still be here with me

Every other day, every other day
Every other day of the week is fine, yeah
But whenever Monday comes
But whenever Monday comes
You can find me crying all of the time

Monday, Monday, can’t trust that day
Monday, Monday, it just turns out that way
Oh, Monday, Monday, won’t go away
Monday, Monday, it’s here to stay

Oh Monday, Monday
Oh Monday, Monday

(Lyrics via Metro Lyrics) (Watch and listen here)

In the lyrics to Monday, Monday, we read and listen to words of unhappiness, lack of trust, tears shed, a broken heart perhaps. Not a pretty picture is painted by the words employed by Phillips.

Like many musical groups of their time, The Mamas and The Papas didn’t always have an easy life. One could say they made some poor choices, but then haven’t we all? One could also say it was because of the tenor of society at that time, and yet there have been difficult time periods throughout history.

What I’d like to bring out in this post is when we choose to walk the pathway Jesus provided for us with His blood– a walk beside Him, a walk ordained by the Heavenly Father, we may still feel unhappiness, faltering trust, tears falling. However, we know there is a foundation underlying our lives that God always loves us unconditionally and waits to show us not only where we have faltered but to also point the way back to the pathway we are to follow.

Clear instructions are provided in a number of Scriptures, but I particularly like this one:

Whoever serves me must follow me; and where I am, my servant also will be. My Father will honor the one who serves me. ~ John 12:26 (NIV)

What about you? Are you walking with Jesus leaning on faith and God to see you through the difficult times? If you have comments or questions, please leave them below. Discussion is a great way to enjoy community!

Today I’m linking up with:

Kelli Woolford at Unforced Rhythms
Joan Davis at Sharing His Beauty

and on Wednesday with:

Holley Gerth at Coffee for Your Heart
Jennifer Dukes Lee at #TellHisStory

Learning Forgiveness Through Prayer

Tuesday of last week was the last day before the final day of school year 2013-2014 at Reynolds High School in Portland, Oregon. Seniors were already out of school awaiting a graduation ceremony on Thursday evening, and the rest of the student body counted down the hours until summer vacation.

At about 8:15 Tuesday morning, a shooting occurred on the Reynolds campus costing two young men in the freshman class their lives — one killed by the other who then took his own life. Had it not been for the quick thinking of an injured track coach and two resource officers from the Portland Police Department, the results of this incident could have been much worse.

Via KOIN News

Via KOIN News

As the news played out all across the media that Tuesday, it was notable that not much coverage  about the young man who arrived at the school with weapons and ammunition was reported. The focus highlighted the victim and his family and friends. Time was being given not only to identify a suspect but for authorities to gather as much information as possible.

My thoughts went to the family of the victim whose life faded away much too soon. I prayed for his soul, his parents and siblings, classmates, teachers, the officers on site. I prayed for our city and our state. For the youth of our world. So much to pray for, except …

Not once did the family or the perpetrator enter my mind.

Are we not to pray for the one believed to be responsible for a crime committed? Even if we don’t know?

What about after all uncertainty has lifted and we know who is responsible? What then?

Jesus said,

To you who are ready for the truth, I say this: Love your enemies. Let them bring out the best in you, not the worst. When someone gives you a hard time, respond with the energies of prayer for that person. If someone slaps you in the face, stand there and take it. If someone grabs your shirt, gift wrap your best coat and make a present of it. If someone takes unfair advantage of you, use the occasion to practice the servant life. No more tit-for-tat stuff. Live generously. (Luke 6:27-30, MSG)

In these verses, Jesus directs us to love our enemies, to respond with prayer energy for that person, and lastly to live generously.

Why is this so hard for us?

A natural response is to fight back. To do otherwise goes against basic human instinct. Our first response is to protect ourselves and others, to seek revenge where an innocent is harmed, and to hope for justice or punishment for the one causing harm. What Jesus requires of us seems impossible!

Yet, God created all of us. The good, the bad, the perpetrator, the victim, the innocent, the evil. We are to pray for all God’s people, not just those we consider good and respectable.

Let’s take a moment in closing to look at Jesus on the cross. He had endured crucifixion, an act soaked in torture and humiliation. And still Jesus was able to say,

Father, forgive these people! They don’t know what they’re doing. (Luke 23:34, CEV)

As followers of Christ, no matter how violent the act may seem, we can embrace Jesus’s example and begin with prayer for all involved in incidents like the one this past week at Reynolds High School.

Luke 6:27

What is your reaction when you hear of another school shooting or mass shooting of any kind? Who do you find yourself praying for? Let’s begin a discussion below.

Blessings,

Sherrey signature B on W

 

 

Linking up today with:

Kelli Woolford @ Unforced Rhythms
Joan @ Sharing His Beauty

on Wednesday with:

Holley Gerth @ Coffee for Your Heart
Jennifer Dukes Lee @ #TellHisStory